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Expression of glucocorticoid and progesterone nuclear receptor genes in archival breast cancer tissue

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, December 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

patent
5 patents

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Expression of glucocorticoid and progesterone nuclear receptor genes in archival breast cancer tissue
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, December 2002
DOI 10.1186/bcr556
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert A Smith, Rod A Lea, Joanne E Curran, Stephen R Weinstein, Lyn R Griffiths

Abstract

Previous studies in our laboratory have shown associations of specific nuclear receptor gene variants with sporadic breast cancer. In order to investigate these findings further, we conducted the present study to determine whether expression levels of the progesterone and glucocorticoid nuclear receptor genes vary in different breast cancer grades. RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded archival breast tumour tissue and converted into cDNA. Sample cDNA underwent PCR using labelled primers to enable quantitation of mRNA expression. Expression data were normalized against the 18S ribosomal gene multiplex and analyzed using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance indicated a variable level of expression of both genes with regard to breast cancer grade (P = 0.00033 for glucocorticoid receptor and P = 0.023 for progesterone receptor). Statistical analysis indicated that expression of the progesterone nuclear receptor is elevated in late grade breast cancer tissue.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Student > Master 4 20%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 6 30%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Unspecified 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2019.
All research outputs
#5,101,760
of 16,101,715 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#700
of 1,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,873
of 267,937 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#10
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,101,715 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,664 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,937 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.