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Measurement and interpretation of skin prick test results

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, February 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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59 Dimensions

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102 Mendeley
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Title
Measurement and interpretation of skin prick test results
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13601-016-0092-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. P. M. van der Valk, R. Gerth van Wijk, E. Hoorn, L. Groenendijk, I. M. Groenendijk, N. W. de Jong

Abstract

There are several methods to read skin prick test results in type-I allergy testing. A commonly used method is to characterize the wheal size by its 'average diameter'. A more accurate method is to scan the area of the wheal to calculate the actual size. In both methods, skin prick test (SPT) results can be corrected for histamine-sensitivity of the skin by dividing the results of the allergic reaction by the histamine control. The objectives of this study are to compare different techniques of quantifying SPT results, to determine a cut-off value for a positive SPT for histamine equivalent prick -index (HEP) area, and to study the accuracy of predicting cashew nut reactions in double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) tests with the different SPT methods. Data of 172 children with cashew nut sensitisation were used for the analysis. All patients underwent a DBPCFC with cashew nut. Per patient, the average diameter and scanned area of the wheal size were recorded. In addition, the same data for the histamine-induced wheal were collected for each patient. The accuracy in predicting the outcome of the DBPCFC using four different SPT readings (i.e. average diameter, area, HEP-index diameter, HEP-index area) were compared in a Receiver-Operating Characteristic (ROC) plot. Characterizing the wheal size by the average diameter method is inaccurate compared to scanning method. A wheal average diameter of 3 mm is generally considered as a positive SPT cut-off value and an equivalent HEP-index area cut-off value of 0.4 was calculated. The four SPT methods yielded a comparable area under the curve (AUC) of 0.84, 0.85, 0.83 and 0.83, respectively. The four methods showed comparable accuracy in predicting cashew nut reactions in a DBPCFC. The 'scanned area method' is theoretically more accurate in determining the wheal area than the 'average diameter method' and is recommended in academic research. A HEP-index area of 0.4 is determined as cut-off value for a positive SPT. However, in clinical practice, the 'average diameter method' is also useful, because this method provides similar accuracy in predicting cashew nut allergic reactions in the DBPCFC. Trial number NTR3572.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 100 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 18%
Student > Master 12 12%
Researcher 11 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 26 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 27 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2017.
All research outputs
#2,476,617
of 18,777,296 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#152
of 544 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,294
of 273,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,777,296 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 544 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them