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Deficiency of iNOS-derived NO accelerates lipid accumulation-independent liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, April 2015
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Title
Deficiency of iNOS-derived NO accelerates lipid accumulation-independent liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12876-015-0269-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuichi Nozaki, Koji Fujita, Koichiro Wada, Masato Yoneda, Takaomi Kessoku, Yoshiyasu Shinohara, Kento Imajo, Yuji Ogawa, Makoto Nakamuta, Satoru Saito, Naohiko Masaki, Yoji Nagashima, Yasuo Terauchi, Atsushi Nakajima

Abstract

Although many of the factors and molecules closely associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have been reported, the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO) on the progression of NASH remains unclear. We therefore investigated the role of iNOS-derived NO in NASH pathogenesis with a long-term follow-up study using systemic iNOS-knockout mice under high-fat diet (HFD) conditions. iNOS-knockout and wild-type mice were fed a basal or HFD for 10 or 48 weeks. Lipid accumulation, fibrosis, and inflammation were evaluated, and various factors and molecules closely associated with NASH were analyzed. Marked fibrosis and inflammation (indicators of NASH) were observed in the livers of iNOS-knockout mice compared to wild-type mice after 48 weeks of a HFD; however, lipid accumulation in iNOS-knockout mice livers was less than in the wild-type. Increased expressions of various cytokines that are transcriptionally controlled by NF-kB in iNOS-deficient mice livers were observed during HFD conditions. iNOS-derived NO may play a protective role against the progression to NASH during an HFD by preventing fibrosis and inflammation, which are mediated by NF-kB activation in Kupffer cells. A lack of iNOS-derived NO accelerates progression to NASH without excessive lipid accumulation.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 29%
Researcher 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 13%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2016.
All research outputs
#7,173,122
of 8,295,152 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#570
of 694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#247,349
of 289,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#17
of 21 outputs
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