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Simultaneous quantification of artesunate and mefloquine in fixed-dose combination tablets by multivariate calibration with middle infrared spectroscopy and partial least squares regression

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
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3 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Simultaneous quantification of artesunate and mefloquine in fixed-dose combination tablets by multivariate calibration with middle infrared spectroscopy and partial least squares regression
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1157-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Breno Maurício Marson, Raquel de Oliveira Vilhena, Camilla Regina de Souza Madeira, Flávia Lada Degaut Pontes, Mário Sérgio Piantavini, Roberto Pontarolo

Abstract

Malaria is one of the most lethal and life-threatening infectious diseases in the world, causing more than half a million deaths annually. Treatment with mefloquine and artesunate is currently recommended by the World Health Organization, and was historically the first artemisinin-based combination therapy used clinically for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum. The problem of poor-quality medicines, such as counterfeit and sub-standard anti-malarials, is a worldwide issue; therefore, it is essential to develop rapid, low cost, solvent-free, and reliable methods for routine quality control for these drugs. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a novel multivariate method for direct simultaneous quantification of mefloquine and artesunate in tablets by diffuse reflectance, middle infrared spectroscopy and partial least squares regression (MIR-PLS). Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and partial least squares regression were applied for simultaneous quantification of artesunate and mefloquine in tablets provided by the Brazilian Government. The model was obtained with full spectra (4000-400 cm(-1)) preprocessed by first derivative and Savitzky-Golay smoothing followed by mean centring, and built with three latent variables. The method was validated according to Brazilian and international guidelines through the measuring of figures of merit, such as trueness, precision, linearity, analytical sensitivity, selectivity, bias, and residual prediction deviation. The results were compared to an HPLC-MS/MS method. The MIR-PLS method provided root mean square errors of prediction lower than 2.0 mg per 100 mg of powder for the two analytes, and proved to be valid according to guidelines for analytical methods that use infrared (IR) spectroscopy with multivariate calibration. For the samples obtained from Brazilian healthcare units, the method provided results statistically similar to those obtained by HPLC-MS/MS. MIR-PLS was found to be suitable for the quality control of these drugs. It is fast, does not use solvents, and does not generate chemical waste. Furthermore, the proposed method may be transferred and developed for use in portable equipment, increasing the possibilities for assessing the quality of these drugs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 23%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Chemistry 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,096,419
of 7,289,383 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,258
of 2,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,591
of 282,588 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#96
of 173 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,289,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,432 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,588 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 173 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.