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Risk factors for falls in older adults in a South African Urban Community

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, February 2016
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Title
Risk factors for falls in older adults in a South African Urban Community
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12877-016-0212-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sebastiana Zimba Kalula, Monica Ferreira, George H. Swingler, Motasim Badri

Abstract

Studies on falls in older adults have mainly been conducted in high income countries. Scant, if any, information exists on risk factors for falls in the older population of sub-Saharan African countries. A cross-sectional survey and a 12-month follow-up study were conducted to determine risk factors for falls in a representative multi-ethnic sample of 837 randomly selected ambulant community-dwelling subjects aged ≥65 years in three suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa. Logistic regression models were fitted to determine the association between (1) falls and (2) recurrent falls occurring during follow-up and their potential socio-demographic, self-reported medical conditions and physical assessment predictors. Prevalence rates of 26.4 % for falls and 11 % for recurrent falls at baseline and 21.9 % for falls and 6.3 % for recurrent falls during follow-up. In both prospective analyses of falls and recurrent falls, history of previous falls, dizziness/vertigo, ethnicity (white or mixed ancestry vs black African) were significant predictors. However, poor cognitive score was a significant predictor in the falls analysis, and marital status (unmarried vs married) and increased time to perform the timed Up and Go test in the recurrent fall analysis but not in both. Other than the timed Up and Go test in recurrent falls analysis, physical assessment test outcomes were not significant predictors of falls. Our study provides simple criteria based on demographic characteristics, medical and physical assessments to identify older persons at increased risk of falls. History taking remains an important part of medical practice in the determination of a risk of falls in older patients. Physical assessment using tools validated in developed country populations may not produce results needed to predict a risk of falls in a different setting.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 19%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Postgraduate 6 13%
Lecturer 3 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 25%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2016.
All research outputs
#5,495,760
of 7,282,696 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#637
of 754 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#198,052
of 282,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#51
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,282,696 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 754 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.