↓ Skip to main content

The effect of long-term danazol treatment on haematological parameters in hereditary angioedema

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The effect of long-term danazol treatment on haematological parameters in hereditary angioedema
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13023-016-0386-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kinga Viktória Kőhalmi, Nóra Veszeli, Zsuzsanna Zotter, Dorottya Csuka, Szabolcs Benedek, Éva Imreh, Lilian Varga, Henriette Farkas

Abstract

The 17-alpha-alkylated derivatives of testosterone are often used for the prevention of oedematous episodes in hereditary angioedema with C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE). However, these agents can have many adverse effects, including erythrocytosis and polyglobulia. Our aim was to investigate occurrence of erythrocytosis and polyglobulia after long-term danazol prophylaxis in C1-INH-HAE. During the initial stage of our retrospective study, we explored whether C1-INH-HAE is associated with susceptibility to erythrocytosis and/or polyglobulia. In the second stage, we analyzed the haematological parameters of 39 C1-INH-HAE patients before, as well as after treatment with danazol for 1, 3, or 5 years. In the third stage, we studied the incidence of erythrocytosis and of polyglobulia after dosing with danazol for more than 5 years. We did not find any significant difference between C1-INH-HAE patients not receiving danazol and healthy controls as regards the occurrence of erythrocytosis or polyglobulia. The haematological parameters did not change after treatment with danazol for 1, 3, or 5 years. Platelet count was an exception-it decreased significantly (p = 0.0115) versus baseline, but within the reference range. Treatment-related polyglobulia did not occur. We observed erythrocytosis in a single female patient after 1-year-and in three female patients after more than 5-year long-treatment with danazol. Erythrocytosis did not require intervention or the discontinuation of danazol therapy. We conclude that neither erythrocytosis, nor polyglobulia occurs more often in C1-INH-HAE patients than in healthy individuals; it can be observed only sporadically even after treatment with danazol.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 21%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 11%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 3 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,507,115
of 11,547,113 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#284
of 1,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,125
of 291,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#12
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,547,113 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,257 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,995 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.