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Brief report on ecological momentary assessment: everyday states predict HIV prevention behaviors

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2016
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Citations

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Title
Brief report on ecological momentary assessment: everyday states predict HIV prevention behaviors
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1814-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul F. Cook, Catherine J. McElwain, Lucy A. Bradley-Springer

Abstract

Prevention behaviors help persons living with HIV (PLWH) to avoid transmitting HIV, and psychological variables have been found to predict HIV prevention behaviors. These variables have typically been measured using retrospective questionnaires about average psychological states over a period of time, which are likely to be biased by selective recall and interpretation. Measuring the same variables as momentary states, in the day-to-day context where they actually occur, may reveal different relationships to behavior. 21 PLWH completed daily surveys about momentary states and prevention behaviors. Brief, validated measures were used to assess control beliefs, mood, stress, coping, social support, stigma, knowledge, and motivation. We used multilevel models to predict prevention behaviors from momentary states the previous day, while controlling for the effect of multiple observations from the same person over time. Participants reported a moderate overall level of HIV prevention behaviors during the 6-month study. Although lapses in prevention were infrequent, there was room for improvement. Control beliefs, mood, and motivation had significant prospective effects on HIV prevention behaviors, rs = 0.07-0.21. Stress and coping had effects approaching significance. Some momentary states predicted prevention behaviors, providing partial support for the motivational model. This finding supports past research showing effects of momentary states on behavior, and advances the science by testing multiple predictors. High within-sample diversity strengthened generalizability, but the overall sample size was small and the findings require replication. Future research should continue to examine the everyday experiences of PLWH as influences on their behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 16%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Researcher 2 8%
Other 7 28%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Computer Science 2 8%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,299,137
of 7,349,306 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,210
of 1,870 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,606
of 282,894 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#72
of 112 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.