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Effectiveness of regular weighing, weight target setting and feedback by community midwives within routine antenatal care in preventing excessive gestational weight gain: randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of regular weighing, weight target setting and feedback by community midwives within routine antenatal care in preventing excessive gestational weight gain: randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Obesity, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40608-016-0086-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda J. Daley, K. Jolly, S. A. Jebb, A. K. Roalfe, L. Mackillop, A. L. Lewis, S. Clifford, S. Kenyon, C. MacArthur, P. Aveyard

Abstract

Many pregnant women gain excess weight during pregnancy which increases the health risks to the mother and her baby. Interventions to prevent excess weight gain need to be given to the whole population to prevent excess weight gain. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a simple and brief intervention embedded withinroutine antenatal care to prevent excessive gestation weight gain. Six hundred and ten pregnant women (between 10-14 weeks gestation), aged ≥18 years with a body mass index (BMI) ≥18.5 kg/m2, planned to receive community midwife led care or shared care at the time of recruitment are eligible to take part in the study. Women will be recruited from four maternity centres in England. Community midwives complete a short training module before delivering the intervention. In the intervention, midwives weigh women, set maximum weight limits for weight gain at each antenatal appointment and ask women to monitor their weight at home. Themaximum weight limit is adjusted by the midwife at each antenatal appointment if women have exceeded their maximum weight gain limit set at their previous appointment. The intervention will be compared with usual antenatal care. The primary outcome is the proportion of women per group who exceed the Institute of Medicine guidelines for gestational weight gain at 38 weeks of pregnancy according to their early pregnancy BMI category. The proposed trial will test a brief intervention comprising regular weighing, target setting and monitoring ofweight during pregnancy that can be delivered at scale as part of routine antenatal care. Using the professional expertise of community midwives, but without specialist training in weight management, the intervention will incur minimal additionalhealthcare costs, and if effective at reducing excess weight gain, is likely to be very cost effective. Current controlled trials ISRCTN67427351. Date assigned 29/10/2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 27%
Psychology 3 5%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2017.
All research outputs
#4,336,412
of 16,419,668 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#67
of 182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,354
of 268,412 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,419,668 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,412 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them