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Assessing the ‘active couch potato’ phenomenon in cardiac rehabilitation: rationale and study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, February 2016
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2 tweeters

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Title
Assessing the ‘active couch potato’ phenomenon in cardiac rehabilitation: rationale and study protocol
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1313-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicole Freene, Borja del Pozo Cruz, Rachel Davey

Abstract

There is little evidence of whether or not those who have attended cardiac rehabilitation (CR) are meeting the physical activity guidelines recommended for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In healthy individuals, there is evidence, that even if individuals are meeting the physical activity guidelines, the harmfulness of too much sedentary behaviour remains (active couch potato (ACP) phenomenon). Currently, there appears to be no evidence of the ACP phenomenon in those attending CR. The aims of the study are to examine the level of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in those with coronary heart disease (CHD) who have attended CR, and to investigate the potential independent associations between these behaviours and cardio-metabolic health, health-related quality of life, exercise capacity, anxiety and depression. A prospective cohort study will be conducted in Australia over 12-months. Baseline data from this study will contribute to an international, multi-centre cross-sectional study (Australia, New Zealand, United States of America, South Africa, Spain, and Portugal). Adults currently enrolled in a 6-week phase II cardiac rehabilitation program with stable CHD and receiving optimal medical treatment +/- revascularisation will be recruited. Outcome measures will be taken at baseline (commence CR), 6 weeks (complete CR), 6 and 12-months. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour will be measured using accelerometry and two questionnaires (Active Australia Survey, Past-Day Adults' Sedentary Time questionnaire). Health outcomes will include body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, lipid profile, blood glucose level, quality-of-life (MacNew), exercise capacity (6-min walk test), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). There has been limited investigation of the physical activity levels and sedentary behaviour of individuals with CHD attending CR. There are no studies assessing the relationship of these behaviours with health outcomes over the short and medium-term. As in healthy individuals, physical activity and sedentary behaviour may have independent effects on cardiovascular risk factors in people with CHD, which may contribute to recurrent cardiovascular events. If this is so, reducing sedentary behaviour may be a feasible first-line, additional and more achievable strategy to improve the health of those with CHD, alongside traditional recommendations to increase the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12615000995572.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 124 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 17%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 26 21%
Unknown 29 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 14%
Sports and Recreations 9 7%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Psychology 8 6%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 39 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,465,270
of 7,313,486 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,714
of 2,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,520
of 282,523 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#70
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,313,486 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,757 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,523 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.