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Places where preschoolers are (in)active: an observational study on Latino preschoolers and their parents using objective measures

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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261 Mendeley
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Title
Places where preschoolers are (in)active: an observational study on Latino preschoolers and their parents using objective measures
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0355-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ester Cerin, Tom Baranowski, Anthony Barnett, Nancy Butte, Sheryl Hughes, Rebecca E. Lee, Jason A. Mendoza, Debbe Thompson, Teresia Margareta O’Connor

Abstract

To combat the disproportionately higher risk of childhood obesity in Latino preschool-aged children, multilevel interventions targeting physical (in) activity are needed. These require the identification of environmental and psychosocial determinants of physical (in) activity for this ethnic group. The objectives were to examine differences in objectively-measured physical activity and sedentary behavior across objectively-determined types of locations in Latino preschool-aged children; and determine whether the differences in physical activity by location were greater in children of parents with higher neighborhood-safety perceptions and physical activity-supportive parenting practices. An observational field study was conducted in Houston (Texas, USA) from August 2011 to April 2012. A purposive sample of Latino children aged 3-5 years and one of their parents (n = 84) were recruited from Census block groups in Houston (Texas) stratified by objectively-assessed high vs. low traffic and crime safety. Seventy-three children provided valid data. Time spent outdoors/indoors tagged with geographic locations was coded into location types based on objective data collected using Global Positioning Systems units that children wore >8 hr/day for a week. Physical activity parenting practices, perceived neighborhood-safety, and demographics were reported by parents. Time spent in sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was measured based on objective data collected using accelerometers (motion sensors) that children wore >8 hr/day for a week. The odds of children engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were 43 % higher when outdoors than indoors (95 % confidence interval: 1.30, 1.58), and the odds of being sedentary were 14 % lower when outdoors compared to indoors (95 % confidence intervals: 0.81, 0.91). This difference depended on parental neighborhood-safety perceptions and parenting practices. Children were most active in parks/playgrounds (30 % of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) and least active in childcare/school settings (8 % of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity). Objectively-assessed time spent in specific locations is correlated with physical activity and sedentary behavior in Latino preschoolers. Interventions and policies should identify ways to engage Latino preschool-aged children in more physical activity and less sedentary behavior while in childcare, and encourage parents to spend more time with their young children in parks/playgrounds and other safe outdoor places.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 261 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 260 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 62 24%
Researcher 37 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 11%
Student > Bachelor 27 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 39 15%
Unknown 52 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 55 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 12%
Sports and Recreations 31 12%
Social Sciences 25 10%
Psychology 16 6%
Other 38 15%
Unknown 64 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2017.
All research outputs
#4,116,703
of 14,207,346 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,111
of 1,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,763
of 267,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#28
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,207,346 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,437 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.6. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.