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Clinical application of genomic profiling to find druggable targets for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients with metastasis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Clinical application of genomic profiling to find druggable targets for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients with metastasis
Published in
BMC Cancer, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2209-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Soojin Cha, Jeongeun Lee, Jong-Yeon Shin, Ji-Yeon Kim, Sung Hoon Sim, Bhumsuk Keam, Tae Min Kim, Dong-Wan Kim, Dae Seog Heo, Se-Hoon Lee, Jong-Il Kim

Abstract

Although adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers are characterized by biological features and clinical outcomes distinct from those of other age groups, the molecular profile of AYA cancers has not been well defined. In this study, we analyzed cancer genomes from rare types of metastatic AYA cancers to identify driving and/or druggable genetic alterations. Prospectively collected AYA tumor samples from seven different patients were analyzed using three different genomics platforms (whole-exome sequencing, whole-transcriptome sequencing or OncoScan™). Using well-known bioinformatics tools (bwa, Picard, GATK, MuTect, and Somatic Indel Detector) and our annotation approach with open access databases (DAVID and DGIdb), we processed sequencing data and identified driving genetic alterations and their druggability. The mutation frequencies of AYA cancers were lower than those of other adult cancers (median = 0.56), except for a germ cell tumor with hypermutation. We identified patient-specific genetic alterations in candidate driving genes: RASA2 and NF1 (prostate cancer), TP53 and CDKN2C (olfactory neuroblastoma), FAT1, NOTCH1, and SMAD4 (head and neck cancer), KRAS (urachal carcinoma), EML4-ALK (lung cancer), and MDM2 and PTEN (liposarcoma). We then suggested potential drugs for each patient according to his or her altered genes and related pathways. By comparing candidate driving genes between AYA cancers and those from all age groups for the same type of cancer, we identified different driving genes in prostate cancer and a germ cell tumor in AYAs compared with all age groups, whereas three common alterations (TP53, FAT1, and NOTCH1) in head and neck cancer were identified in both groups. We identified the patient-specific genetic alterations and druggability of seven rare types of AYA cancers using three genomics platforms. Additionally, genetic alterations in cancers from AYA and those from all age groups varied by cancer type.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 63 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Researcher 8 12%
Other 4 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 4%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 18 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Computer Science 3 4%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 22 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2016.
All research outputs
#9,154,893
of 16,534,657 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,111
of 6,070 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,034
of 268,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,534,657 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,070 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,818 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them