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Bilateral enucleation alters gene expression and intraneocortical connections in the mouse

Overview of attention for article published in Neural Development, January 2012
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Title
Bilateral enucleation alters gene expression and intraneocortical connections in the mouse
Published in
Neural Development, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1749-8104-7-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine A Dye, Charles W Abbott, Kelly J Huffman

Abstract

Anatomically and functionally distinct sensory and motor neocortical areas form during mammalian development through a process called arealization. This process is believed to be reliant on both activity-dependent and activity-independent mechanisms. Although both mechanisms are thought to function concurrently during arealization, the nature of their interaction is not understood. To examine the potential interplay of extrinsic activity-dependent mechanisms, such as sensory input, and intrinsic activity-independent mechanisms, including gene expression in mouse neocortical development, we performed bilateral enucleations in newborn mice and conducted anatomical and molecular analyses 10 days later. In this study, by surgically removing the eyes of the newborn mouse, we examined whether early enucleation would impact normal gene expression and the development of basic anatomical features such as intraneocortical connections and cortical area boundaries in the first 10 days of life, before natural eye opening. We examined the acute effects of bilateral enucleation on the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus and the neocortical somatosensory-visual area boundary through detailed analyses of intraneocortical connections and gene expression of six developmentally regulated genes at postnatal day 10.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Switzerland 1 3%
Unknown 29 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 34%
Researcher 8 25%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Master 1 3%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2012.
All research outputs
#16,628,262
of 18,796,975 outputs
Outputs from Neural Development
#195
of 208 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,803
of 234,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neural Development
#7
of 7 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 208 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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