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Diet-related greenhouse gas emissions assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and validated using 7-day weighed food records

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, February 2016
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Title
Diet-related greenhouse gas emissions assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and validated using 7-day weighed food records
Published in
Environmental Health, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12940-016-0110-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camilla Sjörs, Sara E Raposo, Arvid Sjölander, Olle Bälter, Fredrik Hedenus, Katarina Bälter

Abstract

The current food system generates about 25 % of total greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), including deforestation, and thereby substantially contributes to the warming of the earth's surface. To understand the association between food and nutrient intake and GHGE, we therefore need valid methods to assess diet-related GHGE in observational studies. Life cycle assessment (LCA) studies assess the environmental impact of different food items. We linked LCA data expressed as kg carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) per kg food product to data on food intake assessed by the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) Meal-Q and validated it against a 7-day weighed food record (WFR). 166 male and female volunteers aged 20-63 years completed Meal-Q and the WFR, and their food intake was linked to LCA data. The mean GHGE assessed with Meal-Q was 3.76 kg CO2e per day and person, whereas it was 5.04 kg CO2e using the WFR. The energy-adjusted and deattenuated Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were 0.68 and 0.70, respectively. Moreover, compared to the WFR, Meal-Q provided a good ranking ability, with 90 % of the participants classified into the same or adjacent quartile according to their daily average CO2e. The Bland-Altman plot showed an acceptable level of agreement between the two methods and the reproducibility of Meal-Q was high. This is the first study validating the assessment of diet-related GHGE by a questionnaire. The results suggest that Meal-Q is a useful tool for studying the link between food habits and CO2e in future epidemiological studies.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 114 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 18%
Student > Master 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 18 16%
Researcher 14 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 4%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 27 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 18%
Environmental Science 10 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 7%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Other 27 23%
Unknown 33 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2016.
All research outputs
#18,244,456
of 20,568,640 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#1,278
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,239
of 278,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
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