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An environmentally friendly and productive process for bioethanol production from potato waste

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, March 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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73 Mendeley
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Title
An environmentally friendly and productive process for bioethanol production from potato waste
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13068-016-0464-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fangzhong Wang, Fangzhong Wang, Yi Jiang, Wei Guo, Kangle Niu, Ruiqing Zhang, Shaoli Hou, Mingyu Wang, Yong Yi, Changxiong Zhu, Chunjiang Jia, Xu Fang

Abstract

China is the largest sweet potato producer and exporter in the world. Sweet potato residues (SPRs) separated after extracting starch account for more than 10 % of the total dry matter of sweet potatoes. In China, more than 2 million tons of SPRs cannot be utilized, and the unutilized SPRs are perishable and result in environmental pollution. Thus, an environmentally friendly and highly efficient process for bioethanol production from SPRs should be developed. The swelling behaviour of cellulose causes high-gravity sweet potato residues to be recalcitrant to enzymatic hydrolysis. Cellulase plays a major role in viscosity reduction and glucose production. In contrast, pectinase has a minor role in viscosity reduction but acts as a "helper protein" to assist cellulase in liberating glucose, especially at low cellulase activity levels. In total, 153.46 and 168.13 g/L glucose were produced from high-gravity SPRs with cellulase and a mixture of cellulase and pectinase, respectively. These hydrolysates were fermented to form 73.37 and 79.00 g/L ethanol, respectively. Each kilogram of dry SPR was converted to form 209.62 and 225.71 g of ethanol, respectively. The processes described in this study have an enormous potential for industrial production of bioethanol because they are environmentally friendly, highly productive, economic with low cost, and can be easily manipulated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
United States 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 69 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 21%
Student > Bachelor 13 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Researcher 6 8%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 16%
Chemical Engineering 7 10%
Engineering 7 10%
Energy 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 17 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,766,613
of 7,349,306 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#285
of 568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,334
of 281,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#15
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,349,306 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 568 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,723 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.