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A comparison of visual and quantitative methods to identify interstitial lung abnormalities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, October 2015
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27 Dimensions

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Title
A comparison of visual and quantitative methods to identify interstitial lung abnormalities
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12890-015-0124-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Corrine R. Kliment, Tetsuro Araki, Tracy J. Doyle, Wei Gao, Josée Dupuis, Jeanne C. Latourelle, Oscar E. Zazueta, Isis E. Fernandez, Mizuki Nishino, Yuka Okajima, James C. Ross, Raúl San José Estépar, Alejandro A. Diaz, David J. Lederer, David A. Schwartz, Edwin K. Silverman, Ivan O. Rosas, George R. Washko, George T. O’Connor, Hiroto Hatabu, Gary M. Hunninghake

Abstract

Evidence suggests that individuals with interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) on a chest computed tomogram (CT) may have an increased risk to develop a clinically significant interstitial lung disease (ILD). Although methods used to identify individuals with ILA on chest CT have included both automated quantitative and qualitative visual inspection methods, there has been not direct comparison between these two methods. To investigate this relationship, we created lung density metrics and compared these to visual assessments of ILA. To provide a comparison between ILA detection methods based on visual assessment we generated measures of high attenuation areas (HAAs, defined by attenuation values between -600 and -250 Hounsfield Units) in >4500 participants from both the COPDGene and Framingham Heart studies (FHS). Linear and logistic regressions were used for analyses. Increased measures of HAAs (in ≥10 % of the lung) were significantly associated with ILA defined by visual inspection in both cohorts (P < 0.0001); however, the positive predictive values were not very high (19 % in COPDGene and 13 % in the FHS). In COPDGene, the association between HAAs and ILA defined by visual assessment were modified by the percentage of emphysema and body mass index. Although increased HAAs were associated with reductions in total lung capacity in both cohorts, there was no evidence for an association between measurement of HAAs and MUC5B promoter genotype in the FHS. Our findings demonstrate that increased measures of lung density may be helpful in determining the severity of lung volume reduction, but alone, are not strongly predictive of ILA defined by visual assessment. Moreover, HAAs were not associated with MUC5B promoter genotype.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 26%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 10%
Other 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Computer Science 3 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,956,580
of 7,976,486 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#313
of 631 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,630
of 285,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#18
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,976,486 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 631 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.