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Out-of-pocket expenditure by private households for dental services – empirical evidence from Austria

Overview of attention for article published in Health Economics Review, March 2016
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Title
Out-of-pocket expenditure by private households for dental services – empirical evidence from Austria
Published in
Health Economics Review, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13561-016-0087-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice Sanwald, Engelbert Theurl

Abstract

Dental services differ from other health services in several dimensions. One important difference is that a substantial share of costs of dental services-especially costs beyond routine dental treatment-is paid directly by the patient out-of-pocket. This study analyses the socio-economic determinants of out-of-pocket expenditure for dental services (OOPE) in Austria at the household level. Cross-sectional information on OOPE and household characteristics provided by the Austrian household budget survey 2009/10 was analysed. A two-part model (Logit/GLM) and one-part GLM was applied. The probability of OOPE is strongly affected by the life cycle (structure) of the household. It is higher for higher age classes, higher income, and partially higher levels of education. The type of public insurance has an influence on expenditure probability while the existence of private health insurance has no significant effect. In contrast to the highly statistically significant coefficients in the first stage, the covariates of the second stage remain predominantly insignificant. According to the results, the level of expenditure is driven mainly by the level of education and income. The results of the one-part GLM confirm the results of the two-part model. The results allow new insights into the determinants of OOPE for dental care. The household level turns out to be an adequate basis to study the determinants of OOPE, although caution should be applied before jumping to conclusions for the individual level.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Student > Postgraduate 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 30%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 17%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Sports and Recreations 2 7%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,356,778
of 7,351,662 outputs
Outputs from Health Economics Review
#157
of 170 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#236,336
of 280,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Economics Review
#9
of 9 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 170 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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