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Sleep duration and risk of obesity among a sample of Victorian school children

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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176 Mendeley
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Title
Sleep duration and risk of obesity among a sample of Victorian school children
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2913-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bridget Morrissey, Mary Malakellis, Jill Whelan, Lynne Millar, Boyd Swinburn, Steven Allender, Claudia Strugnell

Abstract

Insufficient sleep is potentially an important modifiable risk factor for obesity and poor physical activity and sedentary behaviours among children. However, inconsistencies across studies highlight the need for more objective measures. This paper examines the relationship between sleep duration and objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time and weight status, among a sample of Victorian Primary School children. A sub-sample of 298 grades four (n = 157) and six (n = 132) Victorian primary school children (aged 9.2-13.2 years) with complete accelerometry and anthropometry data, from 39 schools, were taken from a pilot study of a larger state based cluster randomized control trial in 2013. Data comprised: researcher measured height and weight; accelerometry derived physical activity and sedentary time; and self-reported sleep duration and hypothesised confounding factors (e.g. age, gender and environmental factors). Compared with sufficient sleepers (67 %), those with insufficient sleep (<10 hrs/day) were significantly more likely to be overweight (OR 1.97, 95 % CI:1.11-3.48) or obese (OR 2.43, 95 % CI:1.26-4.71). No association between sleep and objectively measured physical activity levels or sedentary time was found. The strong positive relationship between weight status and sleep deprivation merits further research though PA and sedentary time do not seem to be involved in the relationship. Strategies to improve sleep duration may help obesity prevention initiatives in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 176 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 175 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 33 19%
Student > Master 27 15%
Researcher 14 8%
Student > Postgraduate 12 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 7%
Other 32 18%
Unknown 46 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 21%
Sports and Recreations 15 9%
Psychology 9 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Other 21 12%
Unknown 49 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,999,165
of 11,862,957 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,402
of 8,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,826
of 288,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#61
of 216 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,862,957 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,110 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 216 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.