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Comparative analysis of Wnt expression identifies a highly conserved developmental transition in flatworms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, March 2016
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3 tweeters

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Title
Comparative analysis of Wnt expression identifies a highly conserved developmental transition in flatworms
Published in
BMC Biology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12915-016-0233-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Uriel Koziol, Francesca Jarero, Peter D. Olson, Klaus Brehm

Abstract

Early developmental patterns of flatworms are extremely diverse and difficult to compare between distant groups. In parasitic flatworms, such as tapeworms, this is confounded by highly derived life cycles involving indirect development, and even the true orientation of the tapeworm antero-posterior (AP) axis has been a matter of controversy. In planarians, and metazoans generally, the AP axis is specified by the canonical Wnt pathway, and we hypothesized that it could also underpin axial formation during larval metamorphosis in tapeworms. By comparative gene expression analysis of Wnt components and conserved AP markers in the tapeworms Echinococcus multilocularis and Hymenolepis microstoma, we found remarkable similarities between the early stages of larval metamorphosis in tapeworms and late embryonic and adult development in planarians. We demonstrate posterior expression of specific Wnt factors during larval metamorphosis and show that scolex formation is preceded by localized expression of Wnt inhibitors. In the highly derived larval form of E. multilocularis, which proliferates asexually within the mammalian host, we found ubiquitous expression of posterior Wnt factors combined with localized expression of Wnt inhibitors that correlates with the asexual budding of scoleces. As in planarians, muscle cells are shown to be a source of secreted Wnt ligands, providing an explanation for the retention of a muscle layer in the immotile E. multilocularis larva. The strong conservation of gene expression between larval metamorphosis in tapeworms and late embryonic development in planarians suggests, for the first time, a homologous developmental period across this diverse phylum. We postulate these to represent the phylotypic stages of these flatworm groups. Our results support the classical notion that the scolex is the true anterior end of tapeworms. Furthermore, the up-regulation of Wnt inhibitors during the specification of multiple anterior poles suggests a mechanism for the unique asexual reproduction of E. multilocularis larvae.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Uruguay 1 2%
Unknown 53 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Researcher 6 11%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 13 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 13 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,619,685
of 11,244,871 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#834
of 1,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,786
of 289,519 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#18
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,244,871 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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