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Perceived exercise barriers are reduced and benefits are improved with lifestyle modification in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, March 2016
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2 tweeters

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305 Mendeley
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Title
Perceived exercise barriers are reduced and benefits are improved with lifestyle modification in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Women's Health, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12905-016-0292-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca L. Thomson, Jonathan D. Buckley, Grant D. Brinkworth

Abstract

This study assessed the perceived benefits and barriers to exercise participation in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and monitored changes in response to a lifestyle intervention. Forty-three overweight/obese PCOS women (Age, 30.3(6.2) yrs; BMI, 36.4(5.6) kg/m(2)) were randomised to one of three 20-week lifestyle programs: diet only (DO, n = 13), diet and aerobic exercise (DA, n = 11) and diet and combined aerobic-resistance exercise (DC, n = 19). Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS), weight, aerobic fitness, depression and PCOS specific health-related quality of life were measured. Barriers score was related to depression (r = 0.45, P = 0.002) and aerobic fitness (r = -0.32, P = 0.04), while benefits score was related to aerobic fitness (r = 0.41, P = 0.007). EBBS, benefits and barriers scores improved overtime (P ≤ 0.001). Benefits subscales psychological outlook and social interaction increased (P ≤ 0.001) and life enhancement and preventative health did not change (P ≥ 0.3). Physical performance increased only in DA (P = 0.009). There were no differences between treatments for any of the other subscales (P ≥ 0.2). Barriers subscales exercise milieu, time expenditure and physical exertion reduced (P ≤ 0.003) and family discouragement did not change (P = 0.6). This study demonstrated that lifestyle modification consisting of an energy-restricted diet with or without exercise training improved the perceived benefits from and barriers to exercise. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12606000198527 , registered 26 May 2006.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 305 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 304 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 50 16%
Student > Bachelor 44 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 10%
Researcher 20 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 6%
Other 44 14%
Unknown 100 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 61 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 45 15%
Sports and Recreations 34 11%
Psychology 23 8%
Social Sciences 9 3%
Other 27 9%
Unknown 106 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,339,802
of 7,401,456 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#321
of 422 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,741
of 279,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#11
of 13 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 422 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.