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The Cedar Project WelTel mHealth intervention for HIV prevention in young Indigenous people who use illicit drugs: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, March 2016
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Title
The Cedar Project WelTel mHealth intervention for HIV prevention in young Indigenous people who use illicit drugs: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Trials, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1250-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate Jongbloed, Anton J. Friedman, Margo E. Pearce, Mia L. Van Der Kop, Vicky Thomas, Lou Demerais, Sherri Pooyak, Martin T. Schechter, Richard T. Lester, Patricia M. Spittal

Abstract

Despite successes in preventing and treating HIV, Indigenous people in Canada continue to face disproportionately high rates of HIV infection. Programs that support healing from lifetime trauma, support connection to culture, and reduce drug-related harms are critical to preventing HIV among young Indigenous people who use drugs. The Cedar Project WelTel mHealth intervention proposed here is a structured mobile-phone initiative to connect young Indigenous people who use drugs with Cedar Case Managers in a community-based setting. The intervention consists of a package of supports, including a mobile phone and cellular plan, weekly two-way text messaging, and support from Cedar Case Managers. The Cedar Project WelTel mHealth study is a multi-site Zelen pre-randomized trial to measure the effect of a two-way supportive text-message intervention to reduce HIV vulnerability among young Indigenous people who use illicit drugs in two Canadian cities. The trial is nested within the Cedar Project, an ongoing cohort study addressing HIV and hepatitis C vulnerability among young Indigenous people who use drugs in Vancouver and Prince George, British Columbia. The Cedar Project Partnership, an independent body of Indigenous Elders, leaders, and health/social service experts, governs all aspects of the study. Two hundred participants will be followed over a 16-month period, with HIV propensity score at 6 months as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes include HIV propensity at 1 year, HIV risk, resilience, psychological distress, access to drug-related services, and connection to culture measured at 6 months and 1 year. Primary analysis is by intention to treat. Culturally safe interventions that address barriers to HIV prevention while supporting the strength of young Indigenous people who use drugs are urgently needed. Despite presenting a tremendous opportunity to connect young, highly transient Indigenous people who use drugs to prevention services, supportive two-way mHealth programs have yet to be tested for HIV prevention in a community-based setting with this population. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02437123 https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02437123 (registered 4 May 2015). Protocol version: 24 July 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 352 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 349 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 64 18%
Researcher 43 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 11%
Student > Bachelor 38 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 5%
Other 59 17%
Unknown 92 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 62 18%
Psychology 46 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 40 11%
Social Sciences 32 9%
Computer Science 9 3%
Other 56 16%
Unknown 107 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2016.
All research outputs
#18,989,298
of 21,338,015 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#4,864
of 5,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#235,213
of 280,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#1
of 1 outputs
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