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Implementing performance improvement in New Zealand emergency departments: the six hour time target policy national research project protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, February 2012
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Implementing performance improvement in New Zealand emergency departments: the six hour time target policy national research project protocol
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, February 2012
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-12-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Jones, Linda Chalmers, Susan Wells, Shanthi Ameratunga, Peter Carswell, Toni Ashton, Elana Curtis, Papaarangi Reid, Joanna Stewart, Alana Harper, Tim Tenbensel

Abstract

In May 2009, the New Zealand government announced a new policy aimed at improving the quality of Emergency Department care and whole hospital performance. Governments have increasingly looked to time targets as a mechanism for improving hospital performance and from a whole system perspective, using the Emergency Department waiting time as a performance measure has the potential to see improvements in the wider health system. However, the imposition of targets may have significant adverse consequences. There is little empirical work examining how the performance of the wider hospital system is affected by such a target. This project aims to answer the following questions: How has the introduction of the target affected broader hospital performance over time, and what accounts for these changes? Which initiatives and strategies have been successful in moving hospitals towards the target without compromising the quality of other care processes and patient outcomes? Is there a difference in outcomes between different ethnic and age groups? Which initiatives and strategies have the greatest potential to be transferred across organisational contexts?

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 15%
Other 7 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Master 6 10%
Lecturer 5 8%
Other 15 25%
Unknown 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Psychology 6 10%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 7%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2012.
All research outputs
#12,376,562
of 21,331,631 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#4,208
of 7,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,166
of 139,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,331,631 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,097 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,340 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them