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Bridging the gap: investigating challenges and way forward for intersectoral provision of psychosocial rehabilitation in South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Systems, March 2016
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Title
Bridging the gap: investigating challenges and way forward for intersectoral provision of psychosocial rehabilitation in South Africa
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Systems, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13033-016-0042-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carrie Brooke-Sumner, Crick Lund, Inge Petersen

Abstract

Intersectoral collaboration between government sectors such as Health and Social Development and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in communities is crucial for provision of psychosocial rehabilitation (PSR) for those with severe mental illness. This study aims to provide recommendations for strengthening such intersectoral collaboration in South Africa and with relevance to other low and middle income countries (LMIC), particularly African countries. Twenty-four in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 key informants from the South African Department of Health, two key informants from the Department of Social Development, four key informants from the NGO sector and one key informant from a service user organisation at national level. Framework analysis was conducted with NVivo 10 software. Challenges to intersectoral work identified were lack of communication between sectors, problems delineating roles, and each sector's perception of lack of support from other sectors. Participant-identified strategies for addressing these challenges included improving communication between sectors, promoting leadership from all levels and formalising intersectoral relationships through appropriate written agreements; as well as ensuring that the available resources for PSR are effectively re-directed to district level. This study has outlined several directions for progress to address challenges for intersectoral working for PSR in South Africa. These may be of relevance to other LMIC, particularly those in Africa. Political will and a long-term view will be necessary to realise these strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 81 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 19%
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 14 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 21%
Social Sciences 12 15%
Psychology 11 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 4%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 19 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2018.
All research outputs
#10,822,011
of 13,599,972 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#425
of 478 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,150
of 266,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#10
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,599,972 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 478 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,101 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.