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Changes of diet and dominant intestinal microbes in farmland frogs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
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Title
Changes of diet and dominant intestinal microbes in farmland frogs
Published in
BMC Microbiology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0660-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chun-Wen Chang, Bing-Hong Huang, Si-Min Lin, Chia-Lung Huang, Pei-Chun Liao

Abstract

Agricultural activities inevitably result in anthropogenic interference with natural habitats. The diet and the gut microbiota of farmland wildlife can be altered due to the changes in food webs within agricultural ecosystems. In this work, we compared the diet and intestinal microbiota of the frog Fejervarya limnocharis in natural and farmland habitats in order to understand how custom farming affects the health of in vivo microbial ecosystems. The occurrence, abundance, and the numbers of prey categories of stomach content were significantly different between the frogs inhabiting natural and farmland habitats. In addition, differences in the abundance, species richness, and alpha-diversity of intestinal microbial communities were also statistically significant. The microbial composition, and particularly the composition of dominant microbes living in intestines, indicated that the land use practices might be one of factors affecting the gut microbial community composition. Although the first three dominant microbial phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria found in the intestines of frogs were classified as generalists among habitats, the most dominant gut bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes in natural environments was replaced by the microbial phylum Firmicutes in farmland frogs. Increased intestinal microbial richness of the farmland frogs, which is mostly contributed by numerous microbial species of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Planctomycetes, not only reflects the possible shifts in microbial community composition through the alteration of external ecosystem, but also indicates the higher risk of invasion by disease-related microbes. This study indicates that anthropogenic activities, such as the custom farming, have not only affected the food resources of frogs, but also influenced the health and in vivo microbial ecosystem of wildlife.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 78 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 23%
Researcher 18 22%
Student > Master 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 10 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 14%
Environmental Science 10 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 12 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2018.
All research outputs
#2,517,617
of 20,114,356 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#212
of 2,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,427
of 276,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,114,356 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,944 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,876 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them