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A qualitative study exploring midlife women’s stages of change from domestic violence towards freedom

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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81 Mendeley
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Title
A qualitative study exploring midlife women’s stages of change from domestic violence towards freedom
Published in
BMC Women's Health, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12905-016-0291-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

June Keeling, Debbie Smith, Colleen Fisher

Abstract

Domestic Violence (DV) remains a significant global health problem for women in contemporary society. Existing literature on midlife women's experiences of domestic violence is limited and focuses on health implications. Leaving a violent relationship is a dynamic process that often requires multiple attempts and separations prior to final termination. The aim of this study was to explore the process of leaving a violent relationship for midlife women. This qualitative study involved fifteen women aged between 40-55 who had accessed residential and non-residential community support services for domestic violence within the UK. Community-based support agencies provided these women with access to letters of invitation and participant information sheet explaining the study. The women notified agency staff who contacted the research team to arrange a mutually convenient time to meet within a safe place for both the women and researchers. It was stressed to all potential participants that no identifiable information would be shared with the agency staff. Women were considered survivors of DV if they defined themselves as such. Data were gathered through semi structured interviews, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Midlife women appear to differ from younger women by transitioning quickly though the stages of change, moving rapidly through the breaking free onto the maintenance stage. This rapid transition is the resultant effect of living with long-term violence causing a shift in the women's perception towards the violent partner, with an associated reclamation of power from within the violent relationship. A realisation that rapid departure from the violence may be critical in terms of personal safety, and the realisation that there was something 'wrong' within the relationship, a 'day of dawning' that had not been apparent previously appears to positively affect the trajectory of leaving. Midlife women appeared to navigate through the stages of change in a rapid linear process, forging ahead and exiting the relationship with certainty and without considering options. Whilst these findings appear to differ from younger women's process of leaving, further research is needed to explore and understand the optimum time for intervention and support to maximise midlife women's opportunities to escape an abusive partner, before being reflected appropriately in policy and practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 81 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Other 7 9%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 21%
Psychology 16 20%
Social Sciences 16 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 11%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 17 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,844,830
of 12,607,969 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#160
of 720 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,926
of 265,904 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,607,969 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 720 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,904 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them