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Moderate hyperoxic versus near-physiological oxygen targets during and after coronary artery bypass surgery: a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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101 Mendeley
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Title
Moderate hyperoxic versus near-physiological oxygen targets during and after coronary artery bypass surgery: a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Critical Care, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1240-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bob Smit, Yvo M. Smulders, Monique C. de Waard, Christa Boer, Alexander B. A. Vonk, Dennis Veerhoek, Suzanne Kamminga, Harm-Jan S. de Grooth, Juan J. García-Vallejo, Rene J. P. Musters, Armand R. J. Girbes, Heleen M. Oudemans - van Straaten, Angelique M. E. Spoelstra - de Man

Abstract

The safety of perioperative hyperoxia is currently unclear. Previous studies in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery suggest reduced myocardial damage when avoiding extreme perioperative hyperoxia (>400 mmHg). In this study we investigated whether an oxygenation strategy from moderate hyperoxia to a near-physiological oxygen tension reduces myocardial damage and improves haemodynamics, organ dysfunction and oxidative stress. This was a single-blind, single-centre, open-label, randomised controlled trial in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Fifty patients were randomised to a partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2) target of 200-220 mmHg during cardiopulmonary bypass and 130-150 mmHg during intensive care unit (ICU) admission (control group) versus lower targets of 130-150 mmHg during cardiopulmonary bypass and 80-100 mmHg at the ICU (conservative group). Primary outcome was myocardial injury (CK-MB and Troponin-T) at ICU admission and 2, 6 and 12 hours thereafter. Weighted PaO2 during cardiopulmonary bypass was 220 mmHg (interquartile range (IQR) 211-233) vs. 157 (151-162) in the control and conservative group, respectively (P < 0.0001). During ICU admission, weighted PaO2 was 107 mmHg (86-141) vs. 90 (84-98) (P = 0.03), respectively. Area under the curve of CK-MB was median 23.5 μg/L/h (IQR 18.4-28.1) vs. 21.5 (15.8-26.6) (P = 0.35) and 0.30 μg/L/h (0.25-0.44) vs. 0.39 (0.24-0.43) (P = 0.81) for Troponin-T. Cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, creatinine, lactate and F2-isoprostane levels were not different between groups. Compared to moderate hyperoxia, a near-physiological oxygen strategy does not reduce myocardial damage in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Conservative oxygen administration was not associated with increased lactate levels or hypoxic events. Netherlands Trial Registry NTR4375 , registered on 30 January 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 101 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 16%
Other 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Student > Master 8 8%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 22 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Engineering 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 27 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2021.
All research outputs
#1,889,168
of 18,096,829 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,729
of 5,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,552
of 272,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#23
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,096,829 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,422 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,350 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.