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Efficacy of early neonatal vitamin A supplementation in reducing mortality during infancy in Ghana, India and Tanzania: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, February 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
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Title
Efficacy of early neonatal vitamin A supplementation in reducing mortality during infancy in Ghana, India and Tanzania: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Trials, February 2012
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-13-22
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajiv Bahl, Nita Bhandari, Brinda Dube, Karen Edmond, Wafaie Fawzi, Olivier Fontaine, Jasmine Kaur, Betty R Kirkwood, Jose Martines, Honorati Masanja, Sarmila Mazumder, Salum Msham, Sam Newton, Maureen Oleary, Julia Ruben, Caitlin Shannon, Emily Smith, Sunita Taneja, Sachiyo Yoshida

Abstract

Vitamin A supplementation of 6-59 month old children is currently recommended by the World Health Organization based on evidence that it reduces mortality. There has been considerable interest in determining the benefits of neonatal vitamin A supplementation, but the results of existing trials are conflicting. A technical consultation convened by WHO pointed to the need for larger scale studies in Asia and Africa to inform global policy on the use of neonatal vitamin A supplementation. Three trials were therefore initiated in Ghana, India and Tanzania to determine if vitamin A supplementation (50,000 IU) given to neonates once orally on the day of birth or within the next two days will reduce mortality in the period from supplementation to 6 months of age compared to placebo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Niger 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 121 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 21%
Student > Master 20 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 19 15%
Unknown 27 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 34%
Social Sciences 13 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 3%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 31 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,682,159
of 15,169,182 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#661
of 3,949 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,178
of 124,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,169,182 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,949 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 124,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them