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Human papillomavirus infection and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of case-control studies

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Agents and Cancer, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 221)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

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1 tweeter
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8 Facebook pages
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1 Google+ user

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Human papillomavirus infection and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of case-control studies
Published in
Infectious Agents and Cancer, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13027-016-0058-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jong-Myon Bae, Eun Hee Kim

Abstract

Although systematic reviews (SR) report that human papillomavirus (HPV) increases the risk of breast cancer, there are still disputes regarding this association. In particular, it has been argued that the risk level differs depending on nationality, type of tissue, subtype of HPV, and publication year. Considering that the searching year of publication for the previous SRs was June 2013, a renewal meta-analysis needs to be conducted. Using articles selected in the previous SRs, we compiled a list of references, cited articles, and related articles from the PubMed and Scopus databases. Of these, only publications with data from case-control studies on HPV DNA-positivity in tissues were chosen. Summary odds ratio (SOR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were calculated through meta-analysis. Meta-regression analysis was performed for nationality, types of tissue, subtype of HPV, and publication year. Twenty-two case-control studies were selected, and the total number of individuals in the case and control group was 1897 and 948, respectively. According to the meta-analysis about the 22 publications, HPV infection increased the risk of breast cancer (SOR = 4.02, 95 % CI: 2.42-6.68; I-squared = 44.7 %). Statistical significance was not found in meta-regression performed on the four variables of nationality, type of tissue, subtype of HPV, and publication year which some researchers think sources of heterogeneity. The results of the present study supported the argument that HPV infection increases the risk of breast cancer. Age-matched case-control studies are in need in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Student > Master 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 16%
Chemistry 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2016.
All research outputs
#2,208,047
of 8,750,501 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Agents and Cancer
#42
of 221 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,362
of 282,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Agents and Cancer
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,750,501 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 221 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,931 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.