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The effect of a family-based mindfulness intervention on children with attention deficit and hyperactivity symptoms and their parents: design and rationale for a randomized, controlled clinical trial …

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, March 2016
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Title
The effect of a family-based mindfulness intervention on children with attention deficit and hyperactivity symptoms and their parents: design and rationale for a randomized, controlled clinical trial (Study protocol)
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0773-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Herman H. M. Lo, Samuel Y. S. Wong, Janet Y. H. Wong, Simpson W. L. Wong, Jerf W. K. Yeung

Abstract

About 4 % of children in Hong Kong have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The parents of children with ADHD report higher levels of stress and show more negative parenting behavior. Medication and behavior training are evidence-based treatments, but both show significant limitations. In short, medical treatment is not suitable for preschool children and would suppress growth, whereas parents under stress may not be capable of consistently applying behavior management skills. Mindfulness training can improve attention and facilitate cognitive development and overall functioning. It has been widely adopted as a treatment option in health care, but its application in a family context is limited. In this context, a family-based mindfulness intervention (FBMI) has been developed to promote the attention and mental health of children with attention symptoms and to reduce the stress experienced by their parents. This article describes the design and conduct of the trial. A multicenter, 8-week, waitlist, randomized controlled trial of FBMI is currently being conducted in Hong Kong (from mid-2015 to mid-2016). Its effectiveness will be examined by comparing the participants who receive treatment to those in a waitlist control group. The study population consists of one hundred twenty children with ADHD, or with symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity, between 5 and 7 years of age and their parents. To be included in the study, the children are required to meet or exceed the borderline cutoff score of the Chinese version of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviors Rating Scale (SWAN-C). The primary outcome measures are the children's ADHD symptoms and behavior and the parents' stress. The secondary outcome measures include the children's overall behavioral problems and performance on the Attention Network Test, the parents' ADHD symptoms, the parents' mindful parenting scores, and heart rate variability of parents. This study is probably the first randomized controlled trial of FBMI for young children and their caregivers. A rigorous design and multiple outcome measures are used to examine the effectiveness of FBMI. If the hypotheses are confirmed, FBMI may serve as an additional treatment option for children with ADHD. This study is registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (reference number: ChiCTR-IOR-15007292 ). Registered 28 October 2015.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 402 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nepal 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 400 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 68 17%
Student > Master 67 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 44 11%
Researcher 41 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 8%
Other 71 18%
Unknown 77 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 184 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 8%
Social Sciences 21 5%
Neuroscience 12 3%
Other 26 6%
Unknown 91 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2016.
All research outputs
#11,553,676
of 14,574,779 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,658
of 3,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,535
of 265,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,779 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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