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Time course and predictive factors for lung volume reduction following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of lung tumors

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, March 2016
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Title
Time course and predictive factors for lung volume reduction following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of lung tumors
Published in
Radiation Oncology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13014-016-0616-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael S. Binkley, Joseph B. Shrager, Aadel Chaudhuri, Rita Popat, Peter G. Maxim, David Benjamin Shultz, Maximilian Diehn, Billy W. Loo

Abstract

Stereotactic ablative volume reduction (SAVR) is a potential alternative to lung-volume reduction surgery in patients with severe emphysema and excessive surgical risk. Having previously observed a dose-volume response for localized lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors, we investigated the time course and factors associated with volume reduction. We retrospectively identified 70 eligible patients receiving lung tumor SABR during 2007-2013. We correlated lobar volume reduction (relative to total, bilateral lung volume [TLV]) with volume receiving high biologically effective doses (VXXBED3) and other pre-treatment factors in all patients, and measured the time course of volume changes on 3-month interval CT scans in patients with large V60BED3 (n = 21, V60BED3 ≥4.1 % TLV). Median CT follow-up was 15 months. Median volume reduction of treated lobes was 4.5 % of TLV (range 0.01-13.0 %), or ~9 % of ipsilateral lung volume (ILV); median expansion of non-target adjacent lobes was 2.2 % TLV (-4.6-9.9 %; ~4 % ILV). Treated lobe volume reduction was significantly greater with larger VXXBED3 (XX = 20-100 Gy, R (2)  = 0.52-0.55, p < 0.0001) and smaller with lower pre-treatment FEV1% (R (2)  = 0.11, p = 0.005) in a multivariable linear model. Maximum volume reduction was reached by ~12 months and persisted. We identified a multivariable model for lobar volume reduction after SABR incorporating dose-volume and pre-treatment FEV1% and characterized its time course.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 42%
Engineering 3 12%
Physics and Astronomy 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Unknown 9 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,595,141
of 7,396,084 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#806
of 1,035 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,178
of 275,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#38
of 52 outputs
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