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Different Array CGH profiles within hereditary breast cancer tumors associated to BRCA1 expression and overall survival

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, March 2016
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Title
Different Array CGH profiles within hereditary breast cancer tumors associated to BRCA1 expression and overall survival
Published in
BMC Cancer, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2261-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolina Alvarez, Andrés Aravena, Teresa Tapia, Ester Rozenblum, Luisa Solís, Alejandro Corvalán, Mauricio Camus, Manuel Alvarez, David Munroe, Alejandro Maass, Pilar Carvallo

Abstract

Array CGH analysis of breast tumors has contributed to the identification of different genomic profiles in these tumors. Loss of DNA repair by BRCA1 functional deficiency in breast cancer has been proposed as a relevant contribution to breast cancer progression for tumors with no germline mutation. Identifying the genomic alterations taking place in BRCA1 not expressing tumors will lead us to a better understanding of the cellular functions affected in this heterogeneous disease. Moreover, specific genomic alterations may contribute to the identification of potential therapeutic targets and offer a more personalized treatment to breast cancer patients. Forty seven tumors from hereditary breast cancer cases, previously analyzed for BRCA1 expression, and screened for germline BRCA1 and 2 mutations, were analyzed by Array based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) using Agilent 4x44K arrays. Overall survival was established for tumors in different clusters using Log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Test. Gene lists obtained from aCGH analysis were analyzed for Gene Ontology enrichment using GOrilla and DAVID tools. Genomic profiling of the tumors showed specific alterations associated to BRCA1 or 2 mutation status, and BRCA1 expression in the tumors, affecting relevant cellular processes. Similar cellular functions were found affected in BRCA1 not expressing and BRCA1 or 2 mutated tumors. Hierarchical clustering classified hereditary breast tumors in four major, groups according to the type and amount of genomic alterations, showing one group with a significantly poor overall survival (p = 0.0221). Within this cluster, deletion of PLEKHO1, GDF11, DARC, DAG1 and CD63 may be associated to the worse outcome of the patients. These results support the fact that BRCA1 lack of expression in tumors should be used as a marker for BRCAness and to select these patients for synthetic lethality approaches such as treatment with PARP inhibitors. In addition, the identification of specific alterations in breast tumors associated with poor survival, immune response or with a BRCAness phenotype will allow the use of a more personalized treatment in these patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 20%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Master 4 10%
Librarian 2 5%
Other 9 22%
Unknown 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Computer Science 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 10 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,805,791
of 7,406,294 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,426
of 3,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,045
of 275,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#66
of 172 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,406,294 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,243 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 172 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.