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Microalgal TAG production strategies: why batch beats repeated-batch

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, March 2016
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Microalgal TAG production strategies: why batch beats repeated-batch
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13068-016-0475-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giulia Benvenuti, Giulia Benvenuti, Packo P. Lamers, Guido Breuer, Rouke Bosma, Ana Cerar, René H. Wijffels, Maria J. Barbosa

Abstract

For a commercially feasible microalgal triglyceride (TAG) production, high TAG productivities are required. The operational strategy affects TAG productivity but a systematic comparison between different strategies is lacking. For this, physiological responses of Nannochloropsis sp. to nitrogen (N) starvation and N-rich medium replenishment were studied in lab-scale batch and repeated-batch (part of the culture is periodically harvested and N-rich medium is re-supplied) cultivations under continuous light, and condensed into a mechanistic model. The model, which successfully described both strategies, was used to identify potential improvements for both batch and repeated-batch and compare the two strategies on optimized TAG yields on light (amount of TAGs produced per mol of supplied PAR photons). TAG yields on light, for batch, from 0.12 (base case at high light) to 0.49 g molph (-1) (at low light and with improved strain) and, for repeated-batch, from 0.07 (base case at high light) to 0.39 g molph (-1) (at low light with improved strain and optimized repeated-batch settings). The base case yields are in line with the yields observed in current state-of-the-art outdoor TAG production. For continuous light, an optimized batch process will always result in higher TAG yield on light compared to an optimized repeated-batch process. This is mainly because repeated-batch cycles start with N-starved cells. Their reduced photosynthetic capacity leads to inefficient light use during the regrowth phase which results in lower overall TAG yields compared to a batch process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Austria 1 2%
India 1 2%
China 1 2%
Unknown 52 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 19%
Student > Master 11 19%
Researcher 11 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Other 3 5%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 16%
Chemical Engineering 6 11%
Engineering 4 7%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,595,222
of 7,410,208 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#268
of 577 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,577
of 297,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#11
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,410,208 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 577 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.