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Shifts in taxonomic and functional microbial diversity with agriculture: How fragile is the Brazilian Cerrado?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, March 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

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1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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60 Dimensions

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132 Mendeley
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Title
Shifts in taxonomic and functional microbial diversity with agriculture: How fragile is the Brazilian Cerrado?
Published in
BMC Microbiology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0657-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renata Carolini Souza, Iêda Carvalho Mendes, Fábio Bueno Reis-Junior, Fabíola Marques Carvalho, Marco Antonio Nogueira, Ana Tereza Ribeiro Vasconcelos, Vânia Aparecida Vicente, Mariangela Hungria

Abstract

The Cerrado-an edaphic type of savannah- comprises the second largest biome of the Brazilian territory and is the main area for grain production in the country, but information about the impact of land conversion to agriculture on microbial diversity is still scarce. We used a shotgun metagenomic approach to compare undisturbed (native) soil and soils cropped for 23 years with soybean/maize under conservation tillage-"no-till" (NT)-and conventional tillage (CT) systems in the Cerrado biome. Soil management and fertilizer inputs with the introduction of agriculture improved chemical properties, but decreased soil macroporosity and microbial biomass of carbon and nitrogen. Principal coordinates analyses confirmed different taxonomic and functional profiles for each treatment. There was predominance of the Bacteria domain, especially the phylum Proteobacteria, with higher numbers of sequences in the NT and CT treatments; Archaea and Viruses also had lower numbers of sequences in the undisturbed soil. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, there was dominance of Rhizobiales and of the genus Bradyrhizobium in the NT and CT systems, attributed to massive inoculation of soybean, and also of Burkholderiales. In contrast, Rhizobium, Azospirillum, Xanthomonas, Pseudomonas and Acidobacterium predominated in the native Cerrado. More Eukaryota, especially of the phylum Ascomycota were detected in the NT. The functional analysis revealed lower numbers of sequences in the five dominant categories for the CT system, whereas the undisturbed Cerrado presented higher abundance. High impact of agriculture in taxonomic and functional microbial diversity in the biome Cerrado was confirmed. Functional diversity was not necessarily associated with taxonomic diversity, as the less conservationist treatment (CT) presented increased taxonomic sequences and reduced functional profiles, indicating a strategy to try to maintain soil functioning by favoring taxa that are probably not the most efficient for some functions. Our results highlight that underneath the rustic appearance of the Cerrado vegetation there is a fragile soil microbial community.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 2%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 128 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 21%
Researcher 20 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 12%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 11%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 25 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 6%
Environmental Science 8 6%
Chemistry 3 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 37 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,852,691
of 14,354,014 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#167
of 2,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,848
of 308,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,354,014 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,150 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them