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Predictors of knowledge about tuberculosis: results from SANHANES I, a national, cross-sectional household survey in South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2016
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Title
Predictors of knowledge about tuberculosis: results from SANHANES I, a national, cross-sectional household survey in South Africa
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2951-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pamela Naidoo, Leickness Simbayi, Demetre Labadarios, Yoliswa Ntsepe, Nwabisa Bikitsha, Gadija Khan, Ronel Sewpaul, Sizulu Moyo, Thomas Rehle

Abstract

South Africa is one of the 22 high tuberculosis burden countries that contribute 80 % of the global tuberculosis cases. Tuberculosis is infectious and due to its rapid and easy transmission route poses a threat to population health. Considering the importance of social and psychological factors in influencing health outcomes, appraising knowledge and awareness of tuberculosis, remain vital for effective tuberculosis control. The main aim of this study was to investigate the factors that predict knowledge about tuberculosis among 18-64 year old adults in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey method was used. Multi-stage disproportionate, stratified cluster sampling was used to select households within enumeration areas stratified by province and locality type. Based on the Human Sciences Research Council 2007 master sample, 500 Enumerator Areas representative of the socio-demographic profile of South Africa were identified and a random sample of 20 households was randomly selected from each Enumerator Area, yielding an overall sample of 10 000 households. The tuberculosis module contained in the South African National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey I was the only module that examined the social determinants of an infectious disease. This module was questionnaire-based with no biomarkers obtained to screen for the presence of tuberculosis disease among the participants. Data was collected by administering a researcher developed individual level questionnaire. Simple and multiple linear regression was used to determine the independent variables associated with tuberculosis knowledge. Half the sample (52.6 %) was female and the majority of the respondents were black African (76.5 %). More than two thirds (68.0 %) resided in urban areas, 56.9 % did not complete high school and half were not in formal employment. Significant predictors of tuberculosis knowledge were race, sex, completion of high school, being in employment, having a diagnosis of the disease in ones' life-time and learning about tuberculosis from television, brochures, health workers, and teachers. To reduce the burden of tuberculosis in South Africa, media campaigns targeting both rural and urban communities should include conveying accurate information about the disease. Policy makers should also address structural barriers that vulnerable communities face.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 155 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 38 25%
Researcher 24 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 5%
Other 25 16%
Unknown 27 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 23%
Social Sciences 19 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 35 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,814,468
of 7,419,920 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,750
of 6,530 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,734
of 276,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#140
of 197 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,419,920 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,530 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 197 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.