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Simple viral/minimal piggyBac hybrid vectors for stable production of self-inactivating gamma-retroviruses

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, August 2015
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Title
Simple viral/minimal piggyBac hybrid vectors for stable production of self-inactivating gamma-retroviruses
Published in
BMC Research Notes, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1354-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Boris Troyanovsky, Vira Bitko, Brian Fouty, Victor Solodushko

Abstract

Transient production of gamma-retroviruses, including self-inactivating (SIN) retroviruses, is a common method for rapidly generating virus capable of gene delivery. Stable (continuous) production of virus is preferable to transient production for clinical and biotechnology purposes, however, because it allows for significant quantities of a uniform virus to be generated over a prolonged period of time, thus allowing for longitudinal functional studies and quality analysis. Unfortunately, stable production of SIN retroviruses is difficult to achieve. We describe a novel method to rapidly and cost-effectively create packaging cells capable of continuously producing self-inactivating gamma-retroviruses. We imbedded the SIN proviral construct into a minimal piggyBac transposon vector and then integrated the hybrid vector into packaging cells that already stably expressed the viral gag-pro-pol and envelope genes. Cells that stably produced self-inactivating gamma-retroviruses could be identified (and purified) as early as 3 weeks after initial transfection; these cells produced virus for at least 9 weeks without a decline in titer. This viral-minimal piggyBac hybrid vector allowed for the rapid generation and purification of packaging cells capable of stably producing self-inactivated gamma-retroviruses. This method can be applied to the large-scale production of viruses for use in research, biotechnology, and potentially, clinical trials.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 33%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%
Mathematics 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,618,208
of 7,424,901 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,297
of 1,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,270
of 276,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#80
of 115 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,424,901 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,880 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 115 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.