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Towards next generation maggot debridement therapy: transgenic Lucilia sericata larvae that produce and secrete a human growth factor

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biotechnology, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 893)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
42 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
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Title
Towards next generation maggot debridement therapy: transgenic Lucilia sericata larvae that produce and secrete a human growth factor
Published in
BMC Biotechnology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12896-016-0263-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca J. Linger, Esther J. Belikoff, Ying Yan, Fang Li, Holly A. Wantuch, Helen L. Fitzsimons, Maxwell J. Scott

Abstract

Diabetes and its concurrent complications impact a significant proportion of the population of the US and create a large financial burden on the American health care system. FDA-approved maggot debridement therapy (MDT), the application of sterile laboratory-reared Lucilia sericata (green bottle fly) larvae to wounds, is a cost-effective and successful treatment for diabetic foot ulcers and other medical conditions. Human platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is a secreted dimeric peptide growth factor that binds the PDGF receptor. PDGF-BB stimulates cell proliferation and survival, promotes wound healing, and has been investigated as a possible topical treatment for non-healing wounds. Genetic engineering has allowed for expression and secretion of human growth factors and other proteins in transgenic insects. Here, we present a novel concept in MDT technology that combines the established benefits of MDT with the power of genetic engineering to promote healing. The focus of this study is to create and characterize strains of transgenic L. sericata that express and secrete PDGF-BB at detectable levels in adult hemolymph, whole larval lysate, and maggot excretions/ secretions (ES), with potential for clinical utility in wound healing. We have engineered and confirmed transgene insertion in several strains of L. sericata that express human PDGF-BB. Using a heat-inducible promoter to control the pdgf-b gene, pdgf-b mRNA was detected via semi-quantitative PCR upon heat shock. PDGF-BB protein was also detectable in larval lysates and adult hemolymph but not larval ES. An alternative, tetracycline-repressible pdgf-b system mediated expression of pdgf-b mRNA when maggots were raised on diet that lacked tetracycline. Further, PDGF-BB protein was readily detected in whole larval lysate as well as larval ES. Here we show robust, inducible expression and production of human PDGF-BB protein from two conditional expression systems in transgenic L. sericata larvae. The tetracycline-repressible system appears to be the most promising as PDGF-BB protein was detectable in larval ES following induction. Our system could potentially be used to deliver a variety of growth factors and anti-microbial peptides to the wound environment with the aim of enhancing wound healing, thereby improving patient outcome in a cost-effective manner.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Israel 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 100 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 21%
Student > Master 18 18%
Researcher 13 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 7 7%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 21 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 24 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 24 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 242. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2018.
All research outputs
#98,151
of 19,862,972 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biotechnology
#2
of 893 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,278
of 276,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biotechnology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,862,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 893 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,873 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them