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Factors associated with Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence among dogs in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, March 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Factors associated with Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence among dogs in the United States
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1431-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher S. McMahan, Dongmei Wang, Melissa J. Beall, Dwight D. Bowman, Susan E. Little, Patrick O. Pithua, Julia L. Sharp, Roger W. Stich, Michael J. Yabsley, Robert B. Lund

Abstract

Dogs in the United States are hosts to a diverse range of ticks and tick-borne pathogens, including A. phagocytophilum, an important emerging canine and human pathogen. Previously, a Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC)-sponsored workshop proposed factors purported to be associated with the infection risk for tick-transmitted pathogens in dogs in the United States, including climate conditions, socioeconomic characteristics, local topography, and vector distribution. Approximately four million test results from routine veterinary diagnostic tests from 2011-2013, which were collected on a county level across the contiguous United States, are statistically analyzed with the proposed factors via logistic regression and generalized estimating equations. Spatial prevalence maps of baseline Anaplasma spp. prevalence are constructed from Kriging and head-banging smoothing methods. All of the examined factors, with the exception of surface water coverage, were significantly associated with Anaplasma spp. prevalence. Overall, Anaplasma spp. prevalence increases with increasing precipitation and forestation coverage and decreases with increasing temperature, population density, relative humidity, and elevation. Interestingly, socioeconomic status and deer/vehicle collisions were positively and negatively correlated with canine Anaplasma seroprevalence, respectively. A spatial map of the canine Anaplasma hazard is an auxiliary product of the analysis. Anaplasma spp. prevalence is highest in New England and the Upper Midwest. The results from the two posited statistical models (one that contains an endemic areas assumption and one that does not) are in general agreement, with the major difference being that the endemic areas model estimates a larger prevalence in Western Texas, New Mexico, and Colorado. As A. phagocytophilum is zoonotic, the results of this analysis could also help predict areas of high risk for human exposure to this pathogen.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 73 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 20%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Professor 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 18 24%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 26 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 19%
Environmental Science 6 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,053,730
of 7,438,587 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#696
of 2,024 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,949
of 275,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#59
of 167 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,438,587 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,024 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 167 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.