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Who is our cohort: recruitment, representativeness, baseline risk and retention in the “Watch Me Grow” study?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

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80 Mendeley
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Title
Who is our cohort: recruitment, representativeness, baseline risk and retention in the “Watch Me Grow” study?
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12887-016-0582-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan Woolfenden, Valsamma Eapen, Emma Axelsson, Alexandra Hendry, Bin Jalaludin, Cheryl Dissanayake, Bronwyn Overs, Joseph Descallar, John Eastwood, Stewart Einfeld, Natalie Silove, Kate Short, Deborah Beasley, Rudi Črnčec, Elisabeth Murphy, Katrina Williams

Abstract

The "Watch Me Grow" (WMG) study examines the current developmental surveillance system in South West Sydney. This paper describes the establishment of the study birth cohort, including the recruitment processes, representativeness, follow-up and participants' baseline risk for future developmental risk. Newborn infants and their parents were recruited from two public hospital postnatal wards and through child health nurses during the years 2011-2013. Data was obtained through a detailed participant questionnaire and linked with the participant's electronic medical record (EMR). Representativeness was determined by Chi-square analyses of the available clinical, psychosocial and sociodemographic EMR data, comparing the WMG participants to eligible non-participants. Reasons for non-participation were also elicited. Participant characteristics were examined in six, 12, and 18-month follow-ups. The number of infants recruited totalled 2,025, with 50 % of those approached agreeing to participate. Reasons for parents not participating included: lack of interest, being too busy, having plans to relocate, language barriers, participation in other research projects, and privacy concerns. The WMG cohort was broadly representative of the culturally diverse and socially disadvantaged local population from which it was sampled. Of the original 2025 participants enrolled at birth, participants with PEDS outcome data available at follow-up were: 792 (39 %) at six months, 649 (32 %) at 12 months, and 565 (28 %) at 18 months. Participants with greater psychosocial risk were less likely to have follow-up outcome data. Almost 40 % of infants in the baseline cohort were exposed to at least two risk factors known to be associated with developmental risk. The WMG study birth cohort is a valuable resource for health services due to the inclusion of participants from vulnerable populations, despite there being challenges in being able to actively follow-up this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 79 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 18%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 21%
Psychology 15 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 13%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 18 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2021.
All research outputs
#2,517,838
of 20,439,515 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#357
of 2,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,296
of 279,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,439,515 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,574 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them