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Mutanalyst, an online tool for assessing the mutational spectrum of epPCR libraries with poor sampling

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, April 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Mutanalyst, an online tool for assessing the mutational spectrum of epPCR libraries with poor sampling
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12859-016-0996-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matteo Paolo Ferla

Abstract

Assessing library diversity is an important control step in a directed evolution experiment. To do this, a limited amount of colonies from a test library are sequenced and tested. In the case of an error-prone PCR library, the spectrum of the identified mutations - the proportions of mutations of a specific nucleobase to another- is calculated enabling the user to make more informed predictions on library diversity and coverage. However, the calculations of the mutational spectrum are severely affected by the limited sample sizes. Here an online program, called Mutanalyst, is presented, which not only automates the calculations, but also estimates errors involved. Specifically, the errors are calculated thanks to the complementarity of DNA, which means that a mutation has a complementary mutation on the other sequence. Additionally, in the case of determining the mean number of mutations per sequence it does so by fitting to a Poisson distribution, which is more robust than calculating the average in light of the small sampling size. As a result of the added measures to keep into account of small sample size the user can better assess whether the library is satisfactory or whether error-prone PCR conditions should be adjusted. The program is available at www.mutanalyst.com .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 39%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Computer Science 2 6%
Chemistry 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2016.
All research outputs
#5,781,077
of 11,293,566 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#2,069
of 4,195 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,952
of 282,864 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#64
of 120 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,293,566 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,195 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,864 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 120 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.