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Heterogeneity of human effector CD4+ T cells

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2009
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Title
Heterogeneity of human effector CD4+ T cells
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/ar2843
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Annunziato, Sergio Romagnani

Abstract

For many years the heterogeneity of CD4+ T-helper (Th) cells has been limited to Th1 and Th2 cells, which have been considered not only to be responsible for different types of protective responses, but also for the pathogenesis of many disorders. Th1 cells are indeed protective against intracellular microbes and they are thought to play a pathogenic role in organ-specific autoimmune and other chronic inflammatory disorders. Th2 cells provide protection against helminths, but are also responsible for the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The identification and cloning of new cytokines has allowed one to enlarge the series of functional subsets of CD4+ Th effector cells. In particular, CD4+ Th cells producing IL-17 and IL-22, named Th17, have been initially implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders instead of Th1 cells. However, the more recent studies in both humans and mice suggest that Th17 cells exhibit a high plasticity toward Th1 cells and that both Th17 and Th1 cells may be pathogenic. More recently, another two subsets of effector CD4+ Th cells, named Th9 and Th22 cells, have been described, even if their pathophysiological meaning is still unclear. Despite the heterogeneity of CD4+ effector Th cells being higher than previously thought and some of their subsets exhibiting high plasticity, the Th1/Th2 paradigm still maintains a strong validity.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Brazil 2 1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Cyprus 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 149 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 24%
Student > Master 29 18%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Bachelor 16 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 31 19%
Unknown 15 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 43 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 19 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 1%
Other 6 4%
Unknown 16 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2012.
All research outputs
#2,902,441
of 3,616,414 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#692
of 809 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,236
of 73,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#27
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,616,414 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 809 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 73,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.