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Human longevity: Genetics or Lifestyle? It takes two to tango

Overview of attention for article published in Immunity & Ageing, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 292)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
260 Mendeley
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Title
Human longevity: Genetics or Lifestyle? It takes two to tango
Published in
Immunity & Ageing, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12979-016-0066-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giuseppe Passarino, Francesco De Rango, Alberto Montesanto

Abstract

Healthy aging and longevity in humans are modulated by a lucky combination of genetic and non-genetic factors. Family studies demonstrated that about 25 % of the variation in human longevity is due to genetic factors. The search for genetic and molecular basis of aging has led to the identification of genes correlated with the maintenance of the cell and of its basic metabolism as the main genetic factors affecting the individual variation of the aging phenotype. In addition, studies on calorie restriction and on the variability of genes associated with nutrient-sensing signaling, have shown that ipocaloric diet and/or a genetically efficient metabolism of nutrients, can modulate lifespan by promoting an efficient maintenance of the cell and of the organism. Recently, epigenetic studies have shown that epigenetic modifications, modulated by both genetic background and lifestyle, are very sensitive to the aging process and can either be a biomarker of the quality of aging or influence the rate and the quality of aging. On the whole, current studies are showing that interventions modulating the interaction between genetic background and environment is essential to determine the individual chance to attain longevity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 260 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 254 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 45 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 17%
Student > Postgraduate 32 12%
Student > Master 31 12%
Researcher 30 12%
Other 43 17%
Unknown 35 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 65 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 4%
Social Sciences 10 4%
Other 52 20%
Unknown 51 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 134. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2021.
All research outputs
#187,096
of 18,360,230 outputs
Outputs from Immunity & Ageing
#5
of 292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,725
of 272,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Immunity & Ageing
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,360,230 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,427 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them