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Engineering of Aspergillus niger for the production of secondary metabolites

Overview of attention for article published in Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 107)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 patent

Citations

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60 Dimensions

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152 Mendeley
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Title
Engineering of Aspergillus niger for the production of secondary metabolites
Published in
Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s40694-014-0004-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lennart Richter, Franziska Wanka, Simon Boecker, Dirk Storm, Tutku Kurt, Özlem Vural, Roderich Süßmuth, Vera Meyer

Abstract

Filamentous fungi can each produce dozens of secondary metabolites which are attractive as therapeutics, drugs, antimicrobials, flavour compounds and other high-value chemicals. Furthermore, they can be used as an expression system for eukaryotic proteins. Application of most fungal secondary metabolites is, however, so far hampered by the lack of suitable fermentation protocols for the producing strain and/or by low product titers. To overcome these limitations, we report here the engineering of the industrial fungus Aspergillus niger to produce high titers (up to 4,500 mg • l(-1)) of secondary metabolites belonging to the class of nonribosomal peptides. For a proof-of-concept study, we heterologously expressed the 351 kDa nonribosomal peptide synthetase ESYN from Fusarium oxysporum in A. niger. ESYN catalyzes the formation of cyclic depsipeptides of the enniatin family, which exhibit antimicrobial, antiviral and anticancer activities. The encoding gene esyn1 was put under control of a tunable bacterial-fungal hybrid promoter (Tet-on) which was switched on during early-exponential growth phase of A. niger cultures. The enniatins were isolated and purified by means of reverse phase chromatography and their identity and purity proven by tandem MS, NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The initial yields of 1 mg • l(-1) of enniatin were increased about 950 fold by optimizing feeding conditions and the morphology of A. niger in liquid shake flask cultures. Further yield optimization (about 4.5 fold) was accomplished by cultivating A. niger in 5 l fed batch fermentations. Finally, an autonomous A. niger expression host was established, which was independent from feeding with the enniatin precursor d-2-hydroxyvaleric acid d-Hiv. This was achieved by constitutively expressing a fungal d-Hiv dehydrogenase in the esyn1-expressing A. niger strain, which used the intracellular α-ketovaleric acid pool to generate d-Hiv. This is the first report demonstrating that A. niger is a potent and promising expression host for nonribosomal peptides with titers high enough to become industrially attractive. Application of the Tet-on system in A. niger allows precise control on the timing of product formation, thereby ensuring high yields and purity of the peptides produced.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 151 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 17%
Student > Bachelor 26 17%
Researcher 25 16%
Professor 6 4%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 17 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 46 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 30%
Engineering 12 8%
Chemistry 6 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 3%
Other 13 9%
Unknown 24 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2020.
All research outputs
#4,400,254
of 18,639,770 outputs
Outputs from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#31
of 107 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,033
of 273,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,639,770 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 107 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them