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Thiamine as an adjunctive therapy in cardiac surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II trial

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, March 2016
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Title
Thiamine as an adjunctive therapy in cardiac surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II trial
Published in
Critical Care, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1245-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lars W. Andersen, Mathias J. Holmberg, Katherine M. Berg, Maureen Chase, Michael N. Cocchi, Christopher Sulmonte, Julia Balkema, Mary MacDonald, Sophia Montissol, Venkatachalam Senthilnathan, David Liu, Kamal Khabbaz, Adam Lerner, Victor Novack, Xiaowen Liu, Michael W. Donnino

Abstract

Thiamine is a vitamin that is essential for adequate aerobic metabolism. The objective of this study was to determine if thiamine administration prior to coronary artery bypass grafting would decrease post-operative lactate levels as a measure of increased aerobic metabolism. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients were randomized to receive either intravenous thiamine (200 mg) or placebo both immediately before and again after the surgery. Our primary endpoint was post-operative lactate levels. Additional endpoints included pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, global and cellular oxygen consumption, post-operative complications, and hospital and intensive care unit length of stay. Sixty-four patients were included. Thiamine levels were significantly higher in the thiamine group as compared to the placebo group immediately after surgery (1200 [683, 1200] nmol/L vs. 9 [8, 13] nmol/L, p < 0.001). There was no difference between the groups in the primary endpoint of lactate levels immediately after the surgery (2.0 [1.5, 2.6] mmol/L vs. 2.0 [1.7, 2.4], p = 0.75). Relative pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was lower immediately after the surgery in the thiamine group as compared to the placebo group (15 % [11, 37] vs. 28 % [15, 84], p = 0.02). Patients receiving thiamine had higher post-operative global oxygen consumption 1 hour after the surgery (difference: 0.37 mL/min/kg [95 % CI: 0.03, 0.71], p = 0.03) as well as cellular oxygen consumption. We found no differences in clinical outcomes. There were no differences in post-operative lactate levels or clinical outcomes between patients receiving thiamine or placebo. Post-operative oxygen consumption was significantly increased among patients receiving thiamine. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02322892 , December 14, 2014.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 78 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Professor 5 6%
Other 22 28%
Unknown 25 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 26 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2021.
All research outputs
#14,023,904
of 22,472,572 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#4,685
of 5,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,904
of 280,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#31
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,472,572 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,996 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.0. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,095 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.