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Dealing with the complex dynamics of teaching hospitals

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
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Title
Dealing with the complex dynamics of teaching hospitals
Published in
BMC Medical Education, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0623-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tiuri R. van Rossum, Fedde Scheele, Albert J. J. A. Scherpbier, Henk E. Sluiter, Ide C. Heyligers

Abstract

Innovation and change in postgraduate medical education programs affects teaching hospital organizations, since medical education and clinical service are interrelated.Recent trends towards flexible, time-independent and individualized educational programs put pressure on this relationship. This pressure may lead to organizational uncertainty, unbalance and friction making it an important issue to analyze.The last decade was marked by a transition towards outcome-based postgraduate medical education. During this transition competency-based programs made their appearance. Although competency-based medical education has the potential to make medical education more efficient, the effects are still under debate. And while this debate continues, the field of medical education is already introducing next level innovations: flexible and individualized training programs. Major organizational change, like the transition to flexible education programs, can easily lead to friction and conflict in teaching hospital organizations.This article analyses the organizational impact of postgraduate medical education innovations, with a particular focus on flexible training and competency based medical education. The characteristics of teaching hospital organizations are compared with elements of innovation and complexity theory.With this comparison the article argues that teaching hospital organizations have complex characteristics and behave in a non-linear way. This perspective forms the basis for further discussion and analysis of this unexplored aspect of flexible and competency based education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 15%
Other 6 13%
Lecturer 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 52%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 9%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Psychology 2 4%
Mathematics 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,666,162
of 20,115,055 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#452
of 2,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,790
of 277,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,115,055 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,756 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,285 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them