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Load and failure behavior of human muscle samples in the context of proximal femur replacement

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, April 2016
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Title
Load and failure behavior of human muscle samples in the context of proximal femur replacement
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-0998-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefan Schleifenbaum, Michael Schmidt, Robert Möbius, Thomas Wolfskämpf, Christian Schröder, Ronny Grunert, Niels Hammer, Torsten Prietzel

Abstract

To ensure adequate function after orthopedic tumor reconstruction, it is important to reattach the remaining soft tissue to the implant. This study aimed at obtaining mechanical properties of textile muscle-implant and muscle-bone connections in a preliminary test. Two groups of soft-tissue attachment were mechanically tested and compared: Native bone-muscle samples obtained from human femora and muscles attached to a prosthetic implant by means of Trevira® attachment tubes. Additionally, muscle samples were tested with muscle fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tension load. A uniaxial load was exerted upon all samples. Failure loads of 26.7 ± 8.8 N were observed for the native bone-muscle group and of 18.1 ± 9.9 N for the Trevira® group. Elongations of 94.8 ± 36.2 % were observed for the native bone-muscle group and 79.3 ± 51.8 % for the Trevira® group. The location of failure was mainly observed in the central area of the muscle fibers. Muscle fibers with parallel fiber orientation (47.6 ± 11.5 N) yielded higher tensile strength than those with perpendicular fiber orientation (14.8 ± 4.1 N). Our experiments showed that higher forces were transmitted in the origin and insertion areas than in areas of flat soft tissue reconstruction using attachment tubes. The data indicate that the tested material allows reattaching muscles, but without reinforcing the insertion site. Therefore, attachment tubes with region-dependent and potentially anisotropic material behavior might be advantageous to optimize muscle-bone load transmission after surgery, which may allow lower complication rates and shorter physical recovery.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Master 5 13%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 10 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 17 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Computer Science 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 13 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,689,960
of 7,516,464 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,565
of 1,984 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,368
of 270,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#59
of 86 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.