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An in vitro method to test the safety and efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the healing of a canine skin model

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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11 Facebook pages

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
An in vitro method to test the safety and efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the healing of a canine skin model
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12917-016-0689-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominique Gagnon, Thomas W.G. Gibson, Ameet Singh, Alex R. zur Linden, Jaimie E. Kazienko, Jonathan LaMarre, Gagnon, Dominique, Gibson, Thomas W G, Singh, Ameet, Zur Linden, Alex R, Kazienko, Jaimie E, LaMarre, Jonathan

Abstract

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used clinically as a treatment modality for a variety of medical conditions including wound-healing processes. It is an attractive and emerging method to enhance wound healing and improve clinical outcomes both in human and veterinary medicine. Despite the fact that the use of LLLT continues to gain in popularity, there is no universally accepted theory that defends all its cellular effects and beneficial biological processes in tissue repair. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of LLLT on cellular migration and proliferation of cultured canine epidermal keratinocytes (CPEK) in an in vitro wound healing model. Keratinocyte migration and proliferation were assessed using a scratch migration assay and a proliferation assay, respectively. Fifteen independent replicates were performed for each assay. Canine epidermal keratinocyte cells exposed to LLLT with 0.1, 0.2, and 1.2 J/cm(2) migrated significantly more rapidly (p < 0.03) and showed significantly higher rates of proliferation (p < 0.0001) compared to non-irradiated cells cultured in the same medium and cells exposed to the higher energy dose of 10 J/cm(2). Irradiation with 10 J/cm(2) was characterized by decreased cellular migration and proliferation. These results revealed that LLLT has a measurable, dose-dependent effect on two different aspects of keratinocyte biology in vitro. In this in vitro wound-healing model, LLLT increased cellular migration and proliferation at doses of 0.1, 0.2, and 1.2 J/cm(2) while exposure to 10 J/cm(2) decreased cellular migration and proliferation. These data suggest that the beneficial effects of LLLT in vivo may be due, in part, to effects on keratinocyte behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 21%
Student > Bachelor 11 17%
Researcher 8 12%
Other 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 15 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 9%
Engineering 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 13 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2016.
All research outputs
#1,978,138
of 8,763,848 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#174
of 1,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,455
of 278,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#8
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,763,848 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,355 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,733 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.