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Modern technologies for improving cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces in hospitals

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 1,220)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
63 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
216 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
529 Mendeley
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Title
Modern technologies for improving cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces in hospitals
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13756-016-0111-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

John M. Boyce

Abstract

Experts agree that careful cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are essential elements of effective infection prevention programs. However, traditional manual cleaning and disinfection practices in hospitals are often suboptimal. This is often due in part to a variety of personnel issues that many Environmental Services departments encounter. Failure to follow manufacturer's recommendations for disinfectant use and lack of antimicrobial activity of some disinfectants against healthcare-associated pathogens may also affect the efficacy of disinfection practices. Improved hydrogen peroxide-based liquid surface disinfectants and a combination product containing peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide are effective alternatives to disinfectants currently in widespread use, and electrolyzed water (hypochlorous acid) and cold atmospheric pressure plasma show potential for use in hospitals. Creating "self-disinfecting" surfaces by coating medical equipment with metals such as copper or silver, or applying liquid compounds that have persistent antimicrobial activity surfaces are additional strategies that require further investigation. Newer "no-touch" (automated) decontamination technologies include aerosol and vaporized hydrogen peroxide, mobile devices that emit continuous ultraviolet (UV-C) light, a pulsed-xenon UV light system, and use of high-intensity narrow-spectrum (405 nm) light. These "no-touch" technologies have been shown to reduce bacterial contamination of surfaces. A micro-condensation hydrogen peroxide system has been associated in multiple studies with reductions in healthcare-associated colonization or infection, while there is more limited evidence of infection reduction by the pulsed-xenon system. A recently completed prospective, randomized controlled trial of continuous UV-C light should help determine the extent to which this technology can reduce healthcare-associated colonization and infections. In conclusion, continued efforts to improve traditional manual disinfection of surfaces are needed. In addition, Environmental Services departments should consider the use of newer disinfectants and no-touch decontamination technologies to improve disinfection of surfaces in healthcare.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 529 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Nepal 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Unknown 524 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 80 15%
Student > Master 76 14%
Researcher 68 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 11%
Other 34 6%
Other 107 20%
Unknown 108 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 91 17%
Engineering 41 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 33 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 5%
Other 160 30%
Unknown 141 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 532. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2022.
All research outputs
#34,417
of 21,777,067 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#6
of 1,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#734
of 281,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,777,067 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,220 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,201 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them