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Are two or four hands needed for elderly female bystanders to achieve the required chest compression depth during dispatcher-assisted CPR: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2016
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Title
Are two or four hands needed for elderly female bystanders to achieve the required chest compression depth during dispatcher-assisted CPR: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0238-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Asta Krikscionaitiene, Zilvinas Dambrauskas, Tracey Barron, Egle Vaitkaitiene, Dinas Vaitkaitis

Abstract

Rescuers are often unable to achieve the recommended 5-6 cm CC depth. The physical limitations of elderly bystanders may affect the quality of CC; thus, we investigated new strategies to improve CC performance. We performed a randomized controlled trial in December 2013. Sixty-eight lay rescuers aged 50-75 were randomized to intervention or control pairs (males and females separately). Each pair performed 8 min of DA-CPR on a manikin connected to a PC. Each participant in every pair took turns performing CCs in cycles of 2 min and switched as advised by the dispatcher. In the middle of every 2-min cycle, the dispatcher asked the participants of the intervention group to perform the Andrew's manoeuvre (to push on the shoulders of the person while he/she performed CCs to achieve deeper CC). Data on the quality of the CCs were analysed for each participant and pair. The CC depth in the intervention group increased by 6.4 mm (p = 0.002) compared to the control group (54.2 vs. 47.8 mm) due to a significant difference in the female group. The CC depth in the female intervention and control groups was 51.5 and 44.9 mm. The largest group of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest occurred in males over the age of 60 at home, and accordingly, the most likely witness, if any, is the spouse or family member, most frequently an older woman. There is a growing body of evidence that female rescuers are frequently unable to achieve sufficient CC depth compared to male rescuers. In some instances, the adequate depth of the CCs could only be reached using four hands, with the second pair of hands placed on the shoulders of the rescuer performing CPR.  Andrew's manoeuvre (four-hands CC) during the simulated DA-CPR significantly improved the performance of elderly female rescuers and helped them to achieve the recommended CC depth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 23%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Librarian 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 13 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 21%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Psychology 3 6%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 16 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,541,626
of 7,719,347 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#348
of 578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,893
of 273,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#41
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,719,347 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 578 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.