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Horizontal gene transfer of acetyltransferases, invertases and chorismate mutases from different bacteria to diverse recipients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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16 Dimensions

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Horizontal gene transfer of acetyltransferases, invertases and chorismate mutases from different bacteria to diverse recipients
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12862-016-0651-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason B. Noon, Thomas J. Baum

Abstract

Hoplolaimina plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN) are a lineage of animals with many documented cases of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In a recent study, we reported on three likely HGT candidate genes in the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines, all of which encode secreted candidate effectors with putative functions in the host plant. Hg-GLAND1 is a putative GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT), Hg-GLAND13 is a putative invertase (INV), and Hg-GLAND16 is a putative chorismate mutase (CM), and blastp searches of the non-redundant database resulted in highest similarity to bacterial sequences. Here, we searched nematode and non-nematode sequence databases to identify all the nematodes possible that contain these three genes, and to formulate hypotheses about when they most likely appeared in the phylum Nematoda. We then performed phylogenetic analyses combined with model selection tests of alternative models of sequence evolution to determine whether these genes were horizontally acquired from bacteria. Mining of nematode sequence databases determined that GNATs appeared in Hoplolaimina PPN late in evolution, while both INVs and CMs appeared before the radiation of the Hoplolaimina suborder. Also, Hoplolaimina GNATs, INVs and CMs formed well-supported clusters with different rhizosphere bacteria in the phylogenetic trees, and the model selection tests greatly supported models of HGT over descent via common ancestry. Surprisingly, the phylogenetic trees also revealed additional, well-supported clusters of bacterial GNATs, INVs and CMs with diverse eukaryotes and archaea. There were at least eleven and eight well-supported clusters of GNATs and INVs, respectively, from different bacteria with diverse eukaryotes and archaea. Though less frequent, CMs from different bacteria formed supported clusters with multiple different eukaryotes. Moreover, almost all individual clusters containing bacteria and eukaryotes or archaea contained species that inhabit very similar niches. GNATs were horizontally acquired late in Hoplolaimina PPN evolution from bacteria most similar to the saprophytic and plant-pathogenic actinomycetes. INVs and CMs were horizontally acquired from bacteria most similar to rhizobacteria and Burkholderia soil bacteria, respectively, before the radiation of Hoplolaimina. Also, these three gene groups appear to have been frequent subjects of HGT from different bacteria to numerous, diverse lineages of eukaryotes and archaea, which suggests that these genes may confer important evolutionary advantages to many taxa. In the case of Hoplolaimina PPN, this advantage likely was an improved ability to parasitize plants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2017.
All research outputs
#3,097,090
of 11,459,905 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,023
of 2,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,554
of 280,070 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#29
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,459,905 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,218 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,070 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.