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Increased sleep duration precedes the improvement of other symptom domains during the treatment of acute mania: a retrospective chart review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Increased sleep duration precedes the improvement of other symptom domains during the treatment of acute mania: a retrospective chart review
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0808-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Igor I. Galynker, Zimri S. Yaseen, Siva S. Koppolu, Barney Vaughan, Magdalena Szklarska-Imiolek, Lisa J. Cohen, Thomas M. Salvanti, Hae-Joon Kim

Abstract

Understanding trajectories of symptom changes may help gauge treatment response and better identify therapeutic targets in treatment of acute mania. We examined how symptoms of sleep disturbance, mania, and psychosis resolved in a naturalistic treatment setting, hypothesizing that improvement in sleep would precede improvement in manic and psychotic symptoms. Charts of 100 patients with admitting diagnoses of bipolar mixed or manic episode were retrospectively reviewed. Medications and demographic variables were recorded, and the Clinician-Administered Rating Scale for Mania (CARS-M) mania and psychosis ratings and sleep hours were determined for 8 observation points. Times to minimum symptom level in each domain were compared via Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Symptom correlations and trajectories and medication effects were explored using repeated measures ANOVA and regression models. Manic and psychotic symptom resolution was linear over the time of hospitalization. In contrast, sleep showed a slow initial response, followed by rapid increase to peak, preceding peak improvement in mania and psychosis (p < 0.001). Rate of sleep restoration was a predictor of rate but not of magnitude of treatment response for symptoms mania and psychosis. Patterns of medication use did not affect symptom trajectories. In acute mania, improvement in sleep with treatment is dissociable from resolution in symptoms of mania and psychosis, but there appears to be no therapeutic advantage to patient oversedation. Sleep improves first and may be both a predictor of the rate of treatment response and a useful therapeutic target.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 33%
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Researcher 3 9%
Professor 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 11 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 12%
Social Sciences 4 12%
Neuroscience 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2016.
All research outputs
#8,046,093
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,979
of 3,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,299
of 264,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,293 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them