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Quality of medication use in primary care - mapping the problem, working to a solution: a systematic review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2009
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Mentioned by

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1 Facebook page

Citations

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58 Dimensions

Readers on

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184 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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1 Connotea
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Title
Quality of medication use in primary care - mapping the problem, working to a solution: a systematic review of the literature
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2009
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-7-50
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara Garfield, Nick Barber, Paul Walley, Alan Willson, Lina Eliasson

Abstract

The UK, USA and the World Health Organization have identified improved patient safety in healthcare as a priority. Medication error has been identified as one of the most frequent forms of medical error and is associated with significant medical harm. Errors are the result of the systems that produce them. In industrial settings, a range of systematic techniques have been designed to reduce error and waste. The first stage of these processes is to map out the whole system and its reliability at each stage. However, to date, studies of medication error and solutions have concentrated on individual parts of the whole system. In this paper we wished to conduct a systematic review of the literature, in order to map out the medication system with its associated errors and failures in quality, to assess the strength of the evidence and to use approaches from quality management to identify ways in which the system could be made safer.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 2%
United States 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Saudi Arabia 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 172 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 38 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 16%
Researcher 17 9%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Other 50 27%
Unknown 19 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 36%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 22 12%
Social Sciences 11 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 5%
Engineering 8 4%
Other 37 20%
Unknown 30 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2012.
All research outputs
#11,132,757
of 12,517,134 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,969
of 2,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,970
of 117,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#31
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,010 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,576 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.